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BUSINESS IN SHORT

Slovakia tops car production chart

SLOVAKIA is the world’s number one car producer per capita, according to a research paper by UniCredit Bank. Slovakia returned to the top of the chart after a year’s absence, followed closely by the Czech Republic and Slovenia. These three countries produce around 100 cars per 1,000 citizens, the SITA newswire reported.

SLOVAKIA is the world’s number one car producer per capita, according to a research paper by UniCredit Bank. Slovakia returned to the top of the chart after a year’s absence, followed closely by the Czech Republic and Slovenia. These three countries produce around 100 cars per 1,000 citizens, the SITA newswire reported.

In the world chart of gross car production, Slovakia placed 19th last year, with 557,000 passenger cars, accounting for one percent of overall car production worldwide. In 2009, the country occupied 20th position.

The region remains attractive for the automotive industry due to its low labour costs in comparison to western Europe, geographical position and dense network of suppliers.

“Also with regard to the announced increase in production capacities in the region, we expect that the importance of the region in passenger car production in Europe will again grow in the coming five years,” UniCredit Bank analysts forecast, as quoted by SITA. Car production in the EU jumped 11 percent year-on-year in 2010.

The expansion was fuelled by rising demand outside the EU. The share of European output coming from new EU member states situated in the central-eastern European region shrank last year for the first time since 2001.

Three firms make cars in Slovakia: PSA Peugeot Citroen in Trnava; Kia Motors Slovakia in Žilina; and Volkswagen Slovakia in Bratislava.


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