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Construction law change proposed

BOTH a small-scale revision to the Construction Act drafted by the Transport Ministry and an amendment to the Penal Code proposed by the Justice Ministry introduce tougher sanctions for illegal construction. If passed, the two legal changes will take effect on September 1, 2011, the SITA newswire reported.

BOTH a small-scale revision to the Construction Act drafted by the Transport Ministry and an amendment to the Penal Code proposed by the Justice Ministry introduce tougher sanctions for illegal construction. If passed, the two legal changes will take effect on September 1, 2011, the SITA newswire reported.

The applicable Construction Act from 1976 is toothless, often circumvented and lacks real tools against illegal building projects, Transport Minister Ján Figeľ argued, as quoted by SITA, adding that the new legislation aims to bolster discipline and responsibility.

The revision, which will be submitted for interdepartmental review, stipulates more detailed and more exact rules for state supervision of construction sites and amends measures allowing works to be put on ice.

Not only the owner but also the respective construction company and its supervisor will be accountable for buildings erected without a construction permit. Energy supply stoppage is one of the potential preventive measures featured in the draft law. The ministry plans to pen a brand new Construction Code next year, SITA wrote.

The recently presented Penal Code amendment also deals with the problem of illegal structures. The Justice Ministry proposes that illegal construction should become a crime which could be sanctioned with up to five years in prison.


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