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Sulík: We've got plenty of candidates for head of NBÚ

If the nomination by the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party of Ján Stano for the post of National Security Bureau (NBÚ) head poses a fundamental problem for some in the coalition then SaS stands ready to offer a different nominee, SaS chair Richard Sulík said at a press conference on Wednesday, April 6.

If the nomination by the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party of Ján Stano for the post of National Security Bureau (NBÚ) head poses a fundamental problem for some in the coalition then SaS stands ready to offer a different nominee, SaS chair Richard Sulík said at a press conference on Wednesday, April 6.

Sulík added that his party has a host of candidates to offer who have never worked at the Slovak Information Service (SIS), the country’s main intelligence agency. "We've noted the objections. Stano was a student back then, so he replied to an advert saying a state authority seeks a computer programmer. It was only later that he discovered it was the SIS. He worked there for three years. He's never met Ivan Lexa, never talked to him," Sulík said, as quoted by the TASR newswire, referring to the notorious head of the agency in the 1990s. The Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) has voiced concern about Stano taking the NBÚ job, as his CV mentions that he worked for the SIS during the Lexa era. The NBÚ is responsible for vetting candidates for sensitive state positions.

Coalition leaders meeting on Monday discussed Stano’s name after he was proposed by SaS but did not make a final decision. "As it was a new name to us, we have agreed to comment on the nomination in a week," Prime Minister Iveta Radičová (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ)) said at the time.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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