Spišiak rejects Slota's claims

Responding to a claim made by Slovak National Party (SNS) leader Ján Slota earlier in the day, Slovakia's Police Corps president Jaroslav Spišiak told a press conference on Thursday, April 7, that he had never issued any order for the police to shadow journalists, nor any specific person.

Responding to a claim made by Slovak National Party (SNS) leader Ján Slota earlier in the day, Slovakia's Police Corps president Jaroslav Spišiak told a press conference on Thursday, April 7, that he had never issued any order for the police to shadow journalists, nor any specific person.

"I have never ordered the monitoring of journalists, nor any specific person. When I released such an order, it always concerned only a crime, and only persons that were involved," said Spišiak, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that Slota somehow forgot to mention that one of his party's former ministers is charged with serious economic crimes. Former construction minister Marian Janušek, an SNS nominee, has been charged over his alleged involvement in the infamous 'bulletin-board' tender at the ministry. Another former construction minister and SNS minister, Igor Štefanov, who is currently an SNS MP, faces being stripped of his parliamentary immunity from prosecution in order to be charged with crimes related to the same affair.

Turning to Slota's allegation that the General Prosecutor's Office is investigating a major theft of fuel from the Slovnaft refinery, which Slota claimed took place when the current police chief was head of security at the company, Spišiak said that he did not know anything about it. He added that a certain person had contacted him at the time, claiming that he or she would provide information on a specific theft at Slovnaft providing they were paid €500,000. Spišiak said he subsequently filed a criminal complaint against the person.

Referring then to disciplinary proceedings which Slota claimed Spišiak had been subjected to, Spišiak conceded that he had "borrowed" one litre of petrol from a police car at night. He said this had happened at a time – in the early 1990s – when petrol stations normally closed at night, and he returned the same amount of petrol later. A further disciplinary proceeding concerned Spišiak's involvement in a car accident, but Spišiak said that two alcohol tests had confirmed that he wasn't drink-driving at the time. Slota claimed that Spišiak stole petrol from a police car in 1991 and was involved in a number of car accidents while driving under the influence, but that he had conspired to cover up the incidents.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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