Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

BUSINESS IN SHORT

Quality of Slovak urban life assessed

ONLY 23 percent of Slovaks are happy with the quality of life in their cities, with 63 percent perceiving the quality to be just standard, according to a recent survey conducted by the AKO agency via telephone in March 2011.

ONLY 23 percent of Slovaks are happy with the quality of life in their cities, with 63 percent perceiving the quality to be just standard, according to a recent survey conducted by the AKO agency via telephone in March 2011.

“The most important factors in judging the attractiveness of a city are its environment, safety, access to health care, cleanliness and waste management,” said Lucia Ftáčniková of AKO when presenting the survey results, the TASR newswire wrote.

Ftáčniková said Slovak urban dwellers are mainly happy with shopping, and culture and nightlife, two areas in which respondents did not see a need for improvement. However, more than half of respondents reported feeling an acute need for improvement in health care, public transport, roads, parking, living expenses, personal safety and housing prices.

The survey also found that 60 percent of those surveyed were born in the city where they currently reside, which Ftáčniková said indicates the low mobility of many Slovaks.


Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).