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A TV PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH COVERING THE MOST IMPORTANT EVENTS IN SLOVAKIA OVER THE PAST WEEK (VIDEO INCLUDED)

This week in Slovakia

Content of programme: FinMin tries bankruptcy ruse to dodge debt; Another 100-million euro suit on horizon; Website names and shames profiteers; Nationalist leader spitting mad at parliament Brought to you in cooperation with TV SME.

Content of programme:


FinMin tries bankruptcy ruse to dodge debt;
Another 100-million euro suit on horizon;
Website names and shames profiteers;
Nationalist leader spitting mad at parliament

Brought to you in cooperation with TV SME.

For more news about Slovakia in English please go to spectator.sme.sk

The Finance Ministry is taking an unorthodox approach to dealing with what it suspects is a fraudulent claim for damages. It has asked a court to allow the Tipos state lottery firm to enter restructuring, which like a bankruptcy would give the company protection from its creditors, and allow some debts to be wiped out.

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court is also dealing with another controversial damages claim that could cost taxpayers up to 100 million euros.

Of course, there are easier ways to profit off the state than court cases, which can take up to a decade to decide. For years, public procurement has been putting millions of euros in the hands of companies with ties to the government of the day. Now, thanks to a new website, we have an idea of just how many millions changed hands.

One of the country’s top political experts on public procurement, Ján Slota, a nationalist leader, was at the top of his most boorish form last week, spitting at parliament and accusing the government of betraying Slovakia into the hands of Hungary.

Comment section on the article at 10. Apr 2011 at 0:00

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