Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS..

Rich but still not free

THE ORIGINS of Banská Hodruša are connected with Kerling Hill, where once a medieval mining settlement stood. From there, dwellers moved to lower altitudes, where they founded Hodruša. In the 14th century the settlement grew thanks to new residents from Germany.

THE ORIGINS of Banská Hodruša are connected with Kerling Hill, where once a medieval mining settlement stood. From there, dwellers moved to lower altitudes, where they founded Hodruša. In the 14th century the settlement grew thanks to new residents from Germany.

The fate of Banská Hodruša lay in its dependence on Banská Štiavnica. Hodruša’s rich and influential neighbour considered it as merely a subordinate and behaved accordingly. But the Hodrušans were aware of their power and importance and wanted their independence.

Their first attempt to break free is mentioned in 1488, but Štiavnica suppressed the rebellion forcibly and relations remained unchanged. Four years later, Hodruša sought independence for a second time. The leaders of the revolt ended up in prison, and Hodrušans turned to King Vladislas II Jagiellon of Hungary, demanding the release of the prisoners and the return of the town seal, which had been deposited in Štiavnica. A court refused their demands and instead confirmed Hodruša’s subordination.

However, the insurgents did not give up and a delegation of four travelled to Buda, intending to persuade the king personally. Their actions were interpreted as mutiny and they were all hanged. Banská Hodruša never managed to get rid of its dependent position.

In this postcard from the Austro-Hungarian period we can see the historical centre of the town. In the upper right corner is the Wachthaus built in 1536. The permanent guard service was located here, tasked with warning the town of the potential arrival of Ottoman forces.


Top stories

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Poll: Smer followed by SaS, KDH also in parliament

Had the general election taken place in mid-February, the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) would place second, and the now extra-parliamentary KDH would get nine seats.

Alojz Hlina took over at the helm of KDH

Woman who urinated on the Quran arrested, awaiting trial

Some observers believe the video might lead to increasing security risks for Slovakia.

The accused woman arrives to the court.