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Supreme Court judge dies

A FORMER vice-president of Slovakia’s Supreme Court, Judge Juraj Majchrák, was found dead in the garage of his home in Bratislava on April 14. His death has been ruled a suicide but the police are continuing to investigate the circumstances.

A FORMER vice-president of Slovakia’s Supreme Court, Judge Juraj Majchrák, was found dead in the garage of his home in Bratislava on April 14. His death has been ruled a suicide but the police are continuing to investigate the circumstances.

“In this connection we have launched a criminal prosecution in the matter of the crime of participating in a suicide,” said Tatiana Kurucová, spokesperson for Bratislava’s police, as quoted by the SITA newswire. She did not specify why the prosecution was started and who it might be targeted against.

Majchrák was a known critic of Supreme Court President Štefan Harabin. He had been the presiding judge on several important cases, including the so-called ‘acid gang’ case in which the bodies of murder victims were dissolved in acid.

Majchrák served as the vice-president of the Supreme Court beginning in 1999, and in 2000 he was elected president of the Association of Judges of Slovakia. He retired early from the court last year after being diagnosed with a serious illness.


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