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ICE HOCKEY: Slovakia’s Handzuš available as LA Kings leave NHL playoffs

Since the Los Angeles Kings lost to the San Jose Sharks on April 25 in the 1st round of the National Hockey League playoffs, Slovak striker Michal Handzuš has now become available to join the Slovak national team for the Ice Hockey World Championship.

Since the Los Angeles Kings lost to the San Jose Sharks on April 25 in the 1st round of the National Hockey League playoffs, Slovak striker Michal Handzuš has now become available to join the Slovak national team for the Ice Hockey World Championship.

Handzuš was not able to score any points in the NHL match even though he spent 19:18 minutes on the ice, the Sme daily wrote on its website. Handzuš, 34, a native of Banská Bystrica, will be able to join the Slovak national team in its preparations for the ICWC even before the event begins on April 29.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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