Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Government approves amendment to Labour Code

The cabinet approved changes to the Labour Code after a lengthy discussion at its regular policy meeting on Wednesday, April 27. Ministers changed only one provision in the original proposal, taking out a paragraph concerning minimum salaries. The amendment will be further discussed in parliament, with many lawmakers indicating they will try to insert additional changes to the bill.

The cabinet approved changes to the Labour Code after a lengthy discussion at its regular policy meeting on Wednesday, April 27. Ministers changed only one provision in the original proposal, taking out a paragraph concerning minimum salaries. The amendment will be further discussed in parliament, with many lawmakers indicating they will try to insert additional changes to the bill.

The amendment brings a change in probationary periods, with these remaining at three months for ordinary employees, but increasing to up to six months for managers. Another new feature – although not supported by all members of the government-employer-union tripartite – will be the option of prolonging probationary periods by a further three months following a collective agreement.

The new wording of the Labour Code allows contracts to be extended for a set period up to three times over three years, removing exceptions that were in place for teachers, care workers, and science and research staff. The provision won't apply to substitutes for core employees on parental leave, or for employees who leave their jobs for a post in a trade union or an executive post.

New rules for holiday entitlement will also come into force. Employees will automatically become entitled to 25 days of holiday per year upon reaching the age of 33. Moreover, employees who have been with their company for one year will be entitled to a notice period of one month. If they have been with the company for five years, the notice period will be two months. Other notice periods will be: for more than five years' work, three months; for 10-20 years; four months; and for 20 years and more, the maximum notice period of five months.

The amendment will scrap parallel severance payments and notice periods. Employees will be able to choose the proportion to which they use each option.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).