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Parliament to debate scrapping misdemeanour immunity for MPs

Slovakia’s parliament will debate a proposal to scrap MPs' immunity for misdemeanours at its May session, Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity party) said after a Coalition Council meeting on April 26, the TASR newswire reported. Sulík stated that the proposal does not envisage cancelling criminal immunity as a three fifths constitutional majority (90 votes), with opposition support, would be needed to change this provision. Sulík said he is not counting on any backing from the opposition.

Slovakia’s parliament will debate a proposal to scrap MPs' immunity for misdemeanours at its May session, Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity party) said after a Coalition Council meeting on April 26, the TASR newswire reported.

Sulík stated that the proposal does not envisage cancelling criminal immunity as a three fifths constitutional majority (90 votes), with opposition support, would be needed to change this provision. Sulík said he is not counting on any backing from the opposition.

"As for Smer, they talk the talk but they don't walk the walk," he said, as quoted by TASR.

If immunity for misdemeanours is abolished, MPs will be possibly punished for exceeding speed limits or driving under the influence of alcohol.

A change in lawmakers' immunity was debated in parliament last autumn but the bill, which required a constitutional majority, received the support of only 75 legislators, with 59 voting against.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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