Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Smer wants parliament to amend Slovakia's constitution, PM is opposed

Opposition party Smer wants the Slovak Constitution to be changed so that it recognises the individual but not collective rights of national minorities. "European legislation does not recognise collective rights, but this concept is incorporated in the new Hungarian constitution," said Smer vice-chairman Marek Maďarič on Wednesday, April 27, after a meeting of the shadow cabinet, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

Opposition party Smer wants the Slovak Constitution to be changed so that it recognises the individual but not collective rights of national minorities. "European legislation does not recognise collective rights, but this concept is incorporated in the new Hungarian constitution," said Smer vice-chairman Marek Maďarič on Wednesday, April 27, after a meeting of the shadow cabinet, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

Maďarič expressed disappointment over how the Slovak government is acting in relation to Hungary. He opined that if a neighbouring country is heading towards what he called an authoritarian regime, the government should shout and warn aloud about what is happening.

The exact wording of the proposed amendment to the constitution has not been released yet. Maďarič said that it is now being fine-tuned and will be delivered to parliament by Friday, April 29, so that MPs can discuss it at their next session starting on May 17. A change to the constitution requires a three-fifths majority, which means that Smer would have to persuade coalition MPs to support the change. Smer will also resubmit an amendment to the law on national citizenship.

Prime Minister Iveta Radičová (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ)) said she does not think that Slovakia should amend its constitution. "To change the constitution of Slovakia because of the changes to the constitution in Hungary is a sign of weakness. I don't think that when a leaf moves in Hungary, we have to change the fundamental law," Radičová said on Wednesday. She also denied claims by Smer leader Robert Fico that she had promised Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán that she would not criticise Hungary’s new constitution in public.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Heavy rains flood the Tatras Video

People had to be evacuated and several hiking routes had to be closed.

Stará Lesná

Trump plays with the world like a spoiled child

The White House is now broadcasting its most spectacular soap opera, beating and overcoming those of sundry leaders from different continents and different times.

Donald Trump

Last Week in Slovakia: People marched for LGBTI rights in Bratislava Audio

Listen to all the headlines from The Slovak Spectator's news podcast.

Rainbow Pride in Bratislava

Government has no plans to officially commemorate the victims of the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia

Presidents of the Slovak and Czech Republics will take a train ride to mark the founding of the Czechoslovak State.

Law Faculty of Comenius University in Šafárikovo Square, where the civilian killings by foreign armies on August 21, 1968, were most concentrated.