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Custom offices get radiation detectors

SLOVAKIA’s customs administration has received five hand-held IDENTIFIER GR-135 Plus radioactive isotope detection devices from the United States government, the SITA newswire reported.

SLOVAKIA’s customs administration has received five hand-held IDENTIFIER GR-135 Plus radioactive isotope detection devices from the United States government, the SITA newswire reported.

The devices will make possible better monitoring, identifying, measuring, and localising of the presence of ionising radiation, along with easier identification of the actual radioactive material.

The devices were provided by US embassy representatives on April 27.

US Ambassador Theodore Sedgwick said he hoped that the portable detection devices would increase the overall safety of Slovak citizens.

The spokeswoman for the Customs Directorate, Miroslava Slemenská, said the highly sensitive devices can detect gamma and neutron radiation and can be used as well to detect extremely low levels of radiation or trafficking of camouflaged nuclear materials.


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