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Malženice power plant fired up

REPRESENTATIVES of the Slovak government, regional and local political officials and representatives of the E.ON energy group officially opened a new combined-cycle power station in Malženice near Trnava on May 16.

REPRESENTATIVES of the Slovak government, regional and local political officials and representatives of the E.ON energy group officially opened a new combined-cycle power station in Malženice near Trnava on May 16.

The power plant was symbolically fired up by Economy Minister Juraj Miškov, Environment Minister József Nagy, Jorgen Kildahl, a member of the management board of E.ON Energie AG, and Konrad Kreuzer, the chairman of the board of E.ON Slovensko.

“The €400 million investment by E.ON represents the largest energy investment in Slovakia realised by the company in recent years,” said Kildahl.

Minister Nagy noted in his presentation that Slovakia is too far from securing sustainable electricity generation exclusively from renewable energy resources and highlighted the importance of efficient facilities like the Malženice power plant that generates power from a fossil fuel with as low as possible burden on the environment.

The Malženice power plant is regarded as one of the most advanced in Europe from a technical point of view in its category, boasting an efficiency of more than 59 percent. This high figure is achieved by simultaneous use of gas and steam turbines.

The power plant has an installed capacity of 436 MW and can generate up to 3 billion kWh of electricity per year, sufficient to cover the average annual consumption of 600,000 to 900,000 households.


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