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Special Prosecutor’s office will not pursue criminal action against Interblue Group

The purchaser of Slovakia’s excess carbon dioxide emissions at a bargain-basement price in 2009 will not be charged with a criminal offense as Slovakia’s Special Prosecutor’s office turned down a criminal motion against the US firm Interblue Group, finding the situation was the Slovak state’s fault, the Sme daily reported.

The purchaser of Slovakia’s excess carbon dioxide emissions at a bargain-basement price in 2009 will not be charged with a criminal offense as Slovakia’s Special Prosecutor’s office turned down a criminal motion against the US firm Interblue Group, finding the situation was the Slovak state’s fault, the Sme daily reported.

Environment Minister Jozsef Nagy (Most-Hid) had filed the motion in December 2010 because the state expected an additional €15 million from Interblue Group based on a supplement to the original contract, Sme wrote.

The prosecution says that the state, rather than Interblue, bears the responsibility for the disadvantageous sale of the emission allowances, a deal in which Slovakia is believed to have lost at least €75 million. The prosecution reasoned that the state signed the disadvantageous contract from the very beginning but that this did not imply any intention on the part of Interblue Group to mislead the Slovak Republic.

“We hold the opinion that the crime was committed by representatives of the company,” said Nagy, adding that he will consult with legal experts on further steps.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Jana Liptáková from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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