Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovakia’s Economy Ministry denies discussing sale of its shares in Slovak Telekom

The Economy Ministry has not held talks with anyone about selling its 34-percent stake in Slovak Telekom (ST), Economy Ministry spokesperson Daniela Piršelová told the TASR newswire on May 23.

The Economy Ministry has not held talks with anyone about selling its 34-percent stake in Slovak Telekom (ST), Economy Ministry spokesperson Daniela Piršelová told the TASR newswire on May 23.

“The negotiations pending between the Economy Ministry and Deutsche Telekom concern only the payment of dividends from Deutsche Telekom, which Slovakia, as a 49-percent stakeholder of ST, has a full right to receive," Piršelová stated.

The head of the German telecommunications company, Roland Mahler, told Bloomberg News that Deutsche Telekom is negotiating with the Slovak cabinet to buy the remaining 49-percent stake in ST.

Slovakia’s National Property Fund also holds a 15-percent stake in Slovak Telekom and said that it has not held any negotiations with Deutsche Telekom either.

“The National Property Fund hasn't spoken to the majority stake-owner about selling its stake in Slovak Telekom,” said Miloslav Homola, the director of the executive committee chairman's office.

Earlier this year the Slovak cabinet indicated it had plans to sell the state’s remaining stakes in Slovak Telekom and to use the revenue to reduce the state budget deficit.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Jana Liptáková from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.