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Bear caught in Lučenec will be released in Poľana

In early hours of May 25, a bear that had managed to get into the yard of a family home in Lučenec, was captured, the TASR newswire reported. However, it is apparently not the same animal seen earlier moving around a Rúbanisko residential area.

In early hours of May 25, a bear that had managed to get into the yard of a family home in Lučenec, was captured, the TASR newswire reported. However, it is apparently not the same animal seen earlier moving around a Rúbanisko residential area.

Spokesperson for Town Office in Lučenec, Mária Horňáková, told TASR that a home owner called police at 3 o’clock in the morning saying that a bear was moving around their yard. Officers cornered the animal and veterinary doctor Jaroslav Čermák put it to sleep. “The bear moved around the town for a few more minutes, before falling asleep near the railway station” Čermák said. But he went on to say that he does not believe this was the bear that was seen in Rúbanisko, as this one was slimmer and younger. The bear from the family house was transported to branch of Slovak Forests Company in Kriváň and later released in Poľana. According to Slavomír Finďo, expert on bears from the National Forestry Centre in Zvolen, this animal should be put to sleep again for security reasons and given a monitoring collar. “It is crucial,” he added, “to understand the reasons for such strange behaviour.” Finďo concluded that the bear might try to return to its original territory. “We had a case of a bear in Malá Fatra mountain range, which made a journey of 180 kilometres only to go back to the original territory,” he said.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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