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Malinová 'blood disorder' discounted

THE EXTENSIVE bleeding of Hedviga Žáková, née Malinová, whom ministers of the previous government accused of making up a story about being attacked for speaking Hungarian in public, was not caused by any blood disorder, the Sme daily reported, contradicting an earlier report by Peter Labaš, the dean of the Medical Faculty of Comenius University.

THE EXTENSIVE bleeding of Hedviga Žáková, née Malinová, whom ministers of the previous government accused of making up a story about being attacked for speaking Hungarian in public, was not caused by any blood disorder, the Sme daily reported, contradicting an earlier report by Peter Labaš, the dean of the Medical Faculty of Comenius University.

Malinová’s lawyer Roman Kvasnica said that Malinová has no blood disorders, referring to tests that were conducted after Labaš had submitted his expert medical report, Sme reported. The most recent medical tests question a theory offered by Labaš that Malinová's extensive bleeding from bruises and a lip laceration were caused by poor blood coagulation in 2006.

Malinová was accused by former interior minister Robert Kaliňák of lying about being attacked in Nitra because her assailants heard her speaking Hungarian. She has been officially accused of lying to police but the case has not yet gone before a court.

Kaliňák repeated in a mid May interview with the Sme daily that he believes Malinová is a “pathological liar” and that there is no evidence in the case speaking in her favour, stressing that he would never apologise to her.


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