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Young Slovaks suffer work stress

NEARLY half of young Slovaks complained about stress they say they face at work, 11 percent more than the global average, according to a recent survey conducted by GfK Custom Research polling agency, the TASR newswire reported.

NEARLY half of young Slovaks complained about stress they say they face at work, 11 percent more than the global average, according to a recent survey conducted by GfK Custom Research polling agency, the TASR newswire reported.

About 38 percent of young workers in Slovakia said they are concerned about their work-life balance and 28 percent are worried that their pace of work or stress at work is having a negative impact on their health.

A fear of job loss was expressed by 32 percent of Slovaks in the survey while 27 percent perceived their employer’s pressure to work overtime as problematic.

The survey revealed that only 14 percent of Slovak employees feel as if they are “highly engaged”. Almost one quarter of young Slovaks said they had to accept a job they are not happy with for financial reasons and 27 percent said they had completely redirected their career for financial reasons.

“Low engagement among young Slovak employees results in a phenomenon similar to elsewhere in the world,” the study stated, as quoted by TASR.

“Half of the young employees are actively looking for another job while working in their present job or are planning to do so in the next six months.”

The survey also found that 34 percent of Slovaks are willing to search for work abroad.


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