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Slovakia’s newest political party to be called Nation and Justice (NAS)

Independent MP Anna Belousovová's announced that her new political party will be called Nation and Justice (NAS) at a press conference held on May 27, the TASR newswire reported. Belousovová, who split from the Slovak National Party (SNS) along with MP Rudolf Pučík, said the new party will be based on civilised, democratic, non-confrontational and non-xenophobic patriotism, adding that she has the ambition to get the party into parliament in the next general election scheduled for 2014, while refusing to describe her party as rightist or leftist.

Independent MP Anna Belousovová's announced that her new political party will be called Nation and Justice (NAS) at a press conference held on May 27, the TASR newswire reported.

Belousovová, who split from the Slovak National Party (SNS) along with MP Rudolf Pučík, said the new party will be based on civilised, democratic, non-confrontational and non-xenophobic patriotism, adding that she has the ambition to get the party into parliament in the next general election scheduled for 2014, while refusing to describe her party as rightist or leftist.

Belousovová was not willing to specify NAS's possible partners for cooperation and did not rule out post-election cooperation with SNS, saying that the difference between her party and Ján Slota's party is that while SNS is on a constant search for enemies, NAS won't engage in such polemics.

The deputy chairman of SNS and chief of the party’s parliamentary caucus, Rafael Rafaj, said he was not concerned at all that the SNS caucus would cease to exist after the departure of Belousovová and Pučík.

"It has never happened that a party that made it to the parliament in the election would lose its caucus during the electoral term," Rafaj announced on Slovak Television in the "O päť minút dvanásť" political show. Referring to a legal analysis, the SNS MP explained that a caucus cannot cease to exist just because one or two members leave and the quorum drops below eight members.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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