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Austrian citizens also helped communist-era border guards, Memory Institute finds

The Nation’s Memory Institute published information online about intelligence activities around the borders of communist Czechoslovakia on Tuesday, May 31. It found that the strictly guarded and even landmine-protected border between Czechoslovakia and Austria was also "protected" by at least one Austrian pub owner and several Austrian customs officers, who received money for spying. One Austrian customs officer from Kittsee delivered 165 pieces of intelligence information at 52 meetings, receiving 39,000 Austrian schillings in return, the Sme daily reported on May 31.

The Nation’s Memory Institute published information online about intelligence activities around the borders of communist Czechoslovakia on Tuesday, May 31. It found that the strictly guarded and even landmine-protected border between Czechoslovakia and Austria was also "protected" by at least one Austrian pub owner and several Austrian customs officers, who received money for spying. One Austrian customs officer from Kittsee delivered 165 pieces of intelligence information at 52 meetings, receiving 39,000 Austrian schillings in return, the Sme daily reported on May 31.

One of the Slovaks who also worked for the border police, which spied on people and prevented them from fleeing abroad, was Milan Lovich, who is now an official at the Environmental Inspectorate. He did not comment on the information when approached by Sme; a spokesman for the inspectorate, Michal Štefánek, said Lovich had been appointed because he had the best qualifications for the position.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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