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Poll finds most Slovak managers think it is ok to offer bribes and gifts

More than two-thirds of managers and executives in Slovakia think that offering personal gifts, paying above-standard promotion costs or giving bribes is acceptable when the purpose is to get a commission, according to a poll on fraud and corrupt practices conducted by Ernst & Young in 25 EU countries, the TASR newswire reported. In addition only 7 percent of the Slovak respondents thought that state regulatory bodies were able and willing to effectively prosecute corruption and 82 percent of the Slovak managers wanted to see stricter supervision from the state.

More than two-thirds of managers and executives in Slovakia think that offering personal gifts, paying above-standard promotion costs or giving bribes is acceptable when the purpose is to get a commission, according to a poll on fraud and corrupt practices conducted by Ernst & Young in 25 EU countries, the TASR newswire reported.

In addition only 7 percent of the Slovak respondents thought that state regulatory bodies were able and willing to effectively prosecute corruption and 82 percent of the Slovak managers wanted to see stricter supervision from the state.

Eight in ten respondents confirmed that corruption is widespread in Slovakia (the European average was 62 percent), TASR wrote. However, only one-third of the managers stated that corrupt practices were common in their business sector. Managers and executives stated that it is the top management, which is responsible for restricting corruption in a company, who should bear responsibility when wrongdoing is detected.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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