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Slovakia’s census winds up

For the more than 20,000 census-takers as well as for Slovak residents, the collection of decennial census forms ended on June 6. From June 7 municipal offices will continue to collect the census forms and by the end of next week, they must be transmitted to the country’s Statistics Office, the Sme daily wrote.

For the more than 20,000 census-takers as well as for Slovak residents, the collection of decennial census forms ended on June 6. From June 7 municipal offices will continue to collect the census forms and by the end of next week, they must be transmitted to the country’s Statistics Office, the Sme daily wrote.

It appears that numerous people were not counted in this census due to several flaws and problems and disputes between public bodies that cast a shadow on the census, Sme wrote.

The Interior Ministry criticised the Statistics Office for poor preparation of data for the census-taking while the Slovak Office for Personal Data Protection cast doubt on the anonymity of personal information.

The process lasted from May 13 until June 6 and was to be based on residents’ status as of midnight May 20. It was possible for the first time ever to complete the census electronically. The census cost more than €30 million. Results of the census will be known beginning in February 2014.

A problem common throughout all of Slovakia was a reluctance of residents to place a so-called “identifier” on the census sheets with people being concerned about the anonymity of the census. It is not clear yet what the overall response rate for this census is.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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