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Three masked men padlock entrance to parliament

Three masked activists, acting under the name 'Vendeta Odplata' ('Vendetta Revenge'), informed the media via e-mail that they had chained and padlocked the main entrance door to the Slovak Parliament in the early hours of Thursday, June 9.

Three masked activists, acting under the name 'Vendeta Odplata' ('Vendetta Revenge'), informed the media via e-mail that they had chained and padlocked the main entrance door to the Slovak Parliament in the early hours of Thursday, June 9.

The three men, who have not been identified, claim they did so in protest at what they called the arrogance of political powers. Their action was aimed against a "broken-down institution", they said in the e-mail. "The only thing we're witnessing is brazen theft, cheap populism, marketing-based changing of coats, corruption, and Mafia-like practices," read their message, which also mentioned "laws that aggravate citizens" and false arguments used in order to cover up "pinching tenders, funds and commissions worth billions".

Beata Skyvová from parliament's communications department confirmed that he doors had been chained and padlocked. "The situation is under control and no acute danger emerged," she told the TASR newswire.

The men were reportedly wearing masks inspired by the 2006 US blockbuster 'V for Vendetta'. The lead character in the movie seeks ways to fight a regime that suppresses fundamental human rights.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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