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Heavy fines to be introduced for illegal construction

It will no longer pay developers and investors to lay the cornerstone of a building or structure without obtaining a construction permit, under a new legal amendment approved by the cabinet. Illegal construction will henceforth attract much heavier fines, in some cases reaching €350,000, based on a minor revision to the Construction Act approved by the cabinet of Iveta Radičová on June 8. The heaviest fines will apply to illegal construction in protected areas, the SITA newswire reported.

It will no longer pay developers and investors to lay the cornerstone of a building or structure without obtaining a construction permit, under a new legal amendment approved by the cabinet. Illegal construction will henceforth attract much heavier fines, in some cases reaching €350,000, based on a minor revision to the Construction Act approved by the cabinet of Iveta Radičová on June 8. The heaviest fines will apply to illegal construction in protected areas, the SITA newswire reported.

Prime Minister Iveta Radičová said she believes the revision to the Construction Act, which will now go before parliament, will be an important tool for halting illegal construction. She said, as quoted by SITA, that the last revision to the law, in 2005, “was too general – to the point that illegal construction sites have been growing in front of our very eyes just like mushrooms after the rain and the state was a helpless observer”.

She added that the revision more precisely regulates the execution of construction supervision and measures to halt construction work by installing mechanisms not only against the construction company in question but also against other people involved in the construction process.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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