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Hospitalised Prešov man does not have deadly strain of E.coli bacteria

The E.coli bacteria strain detected in the faeces of a young man from Prešov is not producing the feared shiga toxin that has killed 30 people in Europe, Slovakia's chief hygiene officer, Gabriel Šimko, told the TASR newswire on June 10. "Everything appears to be different than in Germany," said Šimko.

The E.coli bacteria strain detected in the faeces of a young man from Prešov is not producing the feared shiga toxin that has killed 30 people in Europe, Slovakia's chief hygiene officer, Gabriel Šimko, told the TASR newswire on June 10.

"Everything appears to be different than in Germany," said Šimko.

The condition of the 25-year-old man – with intestinal problems, sepsis and uremic syndrome – has been stable since he was admitted into Kosice-based Louis Pasteur University Hospital last week after being transferred from a hospital in Prešov. According to Šimko, the young man could have contracted the infection from a forest water spring.

Doctors have limited information on what the 25-year-old man had eaten or drunk in the past few days.

"From what we know, a few days before the illness broke out he only ate some bread rolls, butter, perhaps some ham and salami. The only thing that could have infected him was water from an uncertified spring," said Šimko. He said that such water sources can be contaminated at any time. Doctors examined the patient's relatives and other people who were in frequent contact with him, with negative results.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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