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Parliamentary committee asks general prosecutor to redraft statements

The General Prosecutor's Office has been asked to redraft statements by the acting General Prosecutor, Ladislav Tichý, regarding the cases of Hedviga Žáková-Malinová and a waste dump in Pezinok and submit them to the next session of the human rights committee of parliament, according to a resolution proposed by Most-Híd (OKS faction) MP Peter Zajac that was approved on June 13, the TASR newswire reported. Tichý had been asked to explain his office’s positions to the committee on June 13 but failed to show up, with the General Prosecutor’s Secretary, Ctibor Košťál, attending instead. Regarding the Žáková-Malinová case, Zajac wanted to know why the General Prosecutor's Office did not withdraw the task of drafting an expert opinion from Peter Labaš who, according to Zajac, was not eligible for the task because he had not taken an oath as an expert. Košťál stated that the expert opinion did not come from Labaš but rather from the Medical Faculty of Comenius University.

The General Prosecutor's Office has been asked to redraft statements by the acting General Prosecutor, Ladislav Tichý, regarding the cases of Hedviga Žáková-Malinová and a waste dump in Pezinok and submit them to the next session of the human rights committee of parliament, according to a resolution proposed by Most-Híd (OKS faction) MP Peter Zajac that was approved on June 13, the TASR newswire reported.

Tichý had been asked to explain his office’s positions to the committee on June 13 but failed to show up, with the General Prosecutor’s Secretary, Ctibor Košťál, attending instead. Regarding the Žáková-Malinová case, Zajac wanted to know why the General Prosecutor's Office did not withdraw the task of drafting an expert opinion from Peter Labaš who, according to Zajac, was not eligible for the task because he had not taken an oath as an expert. Košťál stated that the expert opinion did not come from Labaš but rather from the Medical Faculty of Comenius University.

Regarding the Pezinok waste dump, Zajac asked why there are two radically different authorised statements by the regional Prosecutor's Office on the matter. Zajac considered Košťál's statement to the Committee as different from all the previous ones and found this confusing. "I don't know how to react ... those comments differ," said Zajac.

He suggested that the best course of action would be for the general prosecutor’s office to prepare redrafted statements and submit them to the committee.

Source: TASR
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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