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June poll on political party preferences

According to a political party preference poll conducted by the MVK agency from June 3-9 a yet to be established party that will be led by independent MP Igor Matovič would win 4.7 percent of the vote if parliamentary elections had been held in early June, close to the 5-percent threshold required for a party to enter parliament, the SITA newswire reported.

According to a political party preference poll conducted by the MVK agency from June 3-9 a yet to be established party that will be led by independent MP Igor Matovič would win 4.7 percent of the vote if parliamentary elections had been held in early June, close to the 5-percent threshold required for a party to enter parliament, the SITA newswire reported.

Another party that does not yet exist but is being established by Anna Belousovová, a former member of the Slovak National Party (SNS), would get the votes of 2.2 percent of those polled.

The poll showed Smer again topping the chart, receiving the preferences of 38.5 percent of those polled and capturing 76 seats in the 150-member parliament. The parties of the current ruling coalition would have 72 MPs, SITA wrote. The Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) remained the most popular coalition party with 13 percent of those polled, followed by the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 8.1 percent, Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) with 7.8 percent and Most-Híd with 7.1 percent. The Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK), currently outside parliament, had the support of 3.3 percent of the respondents.

The Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) chaired by former prime minister Vladimír Mečiar would not reach parliament, polling only 3.2 percent. Analysts with the MVK agency said they believe votes for Belousovová's new party, Nation and Justice (NAS), would reduce the preferences for the Slovak National Party below 5 percent, with this poll showing SNS at 3.7 percent.

Out of 1,101 respondents, 16.4 percent said they definitively would not vote in the election and 9.3 percent said they did not know whether they would vote or who they would support.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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