Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak V4 presidency ends amidst Czech transport strike

The meeting of prime ministers of the Visegrad Group (V4) on June 16 marks the end of the one-year presidency of Slovakia. Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová, Czech Prime Minister Petr Nečas, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán are scheduled to evaluate the events of the V4’s programme during the Slovak presidency, review common EU issues, and discuss the forthcoming Hungarian presidency of the EU, the SITA newswire reported.

The meeting of prime ministers of the Visegrad Group (V4) on June 16 marks the end of the one-year presidency of Slovakia. Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radičová, Czech Prime Minister Petr Nečas, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán are scheduled to evaluate the events of the V4’s programme during the Slovak presidency, review common EU issues, and discuss the forthcoming Hungarian presidency of the EU, the SITA newswire reported.

The prime ministers will also discuss V4’s cooperation with members of the Eastern Partnership, further EU enlargement, and cooperation between the four country’s memory institutes. They will also meet with Moldavian Prime Minister Vlado Filat.

Bratislava assumed the V4 Presidency on July 1, 2010. Slovakia chose the motto “Effective Visegrad – Continuity, Cohesion, Solidarity and Awareness” with priorities that included intensifying regional cooperation in key areas as well as presentation of common activities on the group’s 20th anniversary.

The Czech Republic is to assume the rotating presidency on July 1. However, Czech Prime Minister Nečas announced he would not be able to attend due to the country’s transport strike and general domestic situation and that Foreign Affairs Minister Karel Schwarzenberg would serve as his representative at the meeting.

The country-wide strike has paralysed railway transport in the Czech Republic and city transport in Prague, the TASR newswire wrote, and the trade unionists planned to block some crucial highways as well. But the strike had not caused wider chaos in Slovakia up until noon on Thursday, SITA wrote, as it had been announced in advance and many passengers managed to find other means of transport.

Source: SITA, TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

The art of baking Bratislava rolls Photo

Vienna has Sacher torte, Budapest has Somlói galuska and Bratislava has rolls

Ján Šimunek loves Bratislava rolls, especially those filled with poppy seed.

Fifth ice cathedral open to visitors Photo

The ice cathedral in the High Tatras will be open during the whole winter season.

Slovak wines in museum of world wines Photo

Slovak winemakers gifted 336 bottles to the museum.

Christmas tram gets a brand new look this year Photo

Tram decorated as gingerbread house

Christmas tram