Secret ballot vote to be held on Friday for general prosecutor

The Speaker of the Slovak parliament, Richard Sulík from the Freedom and Solidarity party (SaS), told a press conference on June 16 that the special session of parliament he summoned for June 17 to elect a new general prosecutor will be held with a secret ballot. He called his decision as “accommodating the strange verdict of the Slovak Constitutional Court”, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The Speaker of the Slovak parliament, Richard Sulík from the Freedom and Solidarity party (SaS), told a press conference on June 16 that the special session of parliament he summoned for June 17 to elect a new general prosecutor will be held with a secret ballot. He called his decision as “accommodating the strange verdict of the Slovak Constitutional Court”, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

He gave his opinion that the decision of the Constitutional Court was not binding as it had not yet been published but that he wanted to respect it and for that reason the governing coalition agreed to hold a secret ballot vote on June 17. This time MPs will put their ballots in envelopes after marking them; therefore before the vote itself they will need to amend the rules of election. According to Sulík this will secure the secret nature of the vote.

To read more about the turbulent process of electing a new general prosecutor, please go to Constitutional Court suspends parliamentary vote on general prosecutor and Radičová stays as Trnka fails again
.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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