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Judges present at controversial party decry media coverage

Supreme Court judges Daniel Hudák, Milan Lipovský, Juraj Seman and Štefan Michalík have attacked the media for its coverage of a party all four attended in autumn last year. The party, in autumn 2010, involved a performance by a retired lawyer in which he apparently imitated the actions of gunman Ľubomír Harman, who weeks earlier had massacred seven people in Devínska Nova Ves. The lawyer, whose audience also included the then-deputy general prosecutor – now acting general prosecutor – Ladislav Tichý, a regional judge from Žilina, another judge from Čadca (Žilina Region) and a law professor, went so far as to don blue ear defenders like the killer's and brandish an imitation assault rifle similar to the one used in the massacre.

Supreme Court judges Daniel Hudák, Milan Lipovský, Juraj Seman and Štefan Michalík have attacked the media for its coverage of a party all four attended in autumn last year. The party, in autumn 2010, involved a performance by a retired lawyer in which he apparently imitated the actions of gunman Ľubomír Harman, who weeks earlier had massacred seven people in Devínska Nova Ves. The lawyer, whose audience also included the then-deputy general prosecutor – now acting general prosecutor – Ladislav Tichý, a regional judge from Žilina, another judge from Čadca (Žilina Region) and a law professor, went so far as to don blue ear defenders like the killer's and brandish an imitation assault rifle similar to the one used in the massacre.

The four Supreme Court judges issued a statement on Wednesday, June 15, saying that only one person had complained.

"Only a single participant of the meeting, who wasn't a judge, reported what the media called inappropriate behaviour. However, there was no organised performance, in which we would be involved. It has never been, nor will it ever be, our intention to dishonour the memory of victims from Devínska Nová Ves in any way whatsoever," the judges said in their statement.

They insisted that any connection between the party and the shooting spree had been artificially created by the media. "Such attacks only distort public opinion," the statement continued, before going on to brand "some politicians who present a certain stance in public while attending real alcoholic and narco-parties in private" as "nothing but populists". The judges did not name any politicians and presented no evidence to back their claims.

Source: TASR

To read more on this story, see Justice Minister Žitňanská objects to event mimicking shooting spree.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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