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Čentéš elected as prosecutor general

Candidate of the ruling coalition, Jozef Čentéš was elected as prosecutor general in a secret ballot in parliament on June 17. Čentéš won the support of 79 of the 80 deputies present. Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič appoints the prosecutor general, according to the SITA newswire.

Candidate of the ruling coalition, Jozef Čentéš was elected as prosecutor general in a secret ballot in parliament on June 17. Čentéš won the support of 79 of the 80 deputies present. Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič appoints the prosecutor general, according to the SITA newswire.

Slovakia’s Constitutional Court issued a provisional ruling on June 15 indicating that the parliamentary vote on a new general prosecutor should be held only after the court decides on the merits of the case before it – whether it was constitutional for the voting method to be changed from a secret ballot to an open, recorded ballot, the TASR newswire reported.

Following the June 15 ruling, Sulík decided to press ahead with the vote on June 17, but using a secret method.

“In order to observe the strange ruling of the Constitutional Court, by which we were banned from voting publicly, the election, upon the proposal of 15 coalition deputies, will be secret,” he said, as quoted by TASR.

The ruling coalition has gone to considerable lengths over the past six months to change the secret method of voting previously used by MPs to select the general prosecutor into a public vote. However, the legislation, produced by the four-party coalition led by Iveta Radičová and approved by parliament, was challenged at the Constitutional Court by acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý. Tichý got his job by default when the term of the previous general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, expired in February.

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