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Parliament overrides president's veto of Press Code amendment

The Slovak parliament overrode President Ivan Gašparovič's veto on the amendment to the Press Code on June 29 and did not comply with the president's request that the term 'good manners' be removed from the amendment, the TASR newswire reported. According to the amendment approved by parliament, publishers will be allowed to refuse to publish a correction, reaction or additional notice in response to a published article if this constitutes a crime, misdemeanour or other offence or is at variance with good manners and the legally protected interests of third persons. Gašparovič conceded, as reported by TASR, that the term 'good manners' is widely used in Slovakia's laws but added that it has not been defined. The legislation restricts the right of public officials to reply if the published information concerns their public role. They will still enjoy full rights as private persons. The amendment states that persons will no longer have the right to ask for financial compensation if a correction, reply or additional announcement is not published. Currently, compensation can range between €1,660 and €4,980 based on the decision made by a court. After the amendment becomes effective courts will only rule on whether or not replies should be published.

The Slovak parliament overrode President Ivan Gašparovič's veto on the amendment to the Press Code on June 29 and did not comply with the president's request that the term 'good manners' be removed from the amendment, the TASR newswire reported.

According to the amendment approved by parliament, publishers will be allowed to refuse to publish a correction, reaction or additional notice in response to a published article if this constitutes a crime, misdemeanour or other offence or is at variance with good manners and the legally protected interests of third persons. Gašparovič conceded, as reported by TASR, that the term 'good manners' is widely used in Slovakia's laws but added that it has not been defined.

The legislation restricts the right of public officials to reply if the published information concerns their public role. They will still enjoy full rights as private persons. The amendment states that persons will no longer have the right to ask for financial compensation if a correction, reply or additional announcement is not published. Currently, compensation can range between €1,660 and €4,980 based on the decision made by a court. After the amendment becomes effective courts will only rule on whether or not replies should be published.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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