NEWS IN SHORT

Ministers want less strict law on public access

MINISTRIES and state institutions have been interpreting Slovakia’s freedom of information law in a peculiar way, the Sme daily wrote on June 29. During the interdepartmental review of the legislation prepared by the Justice Ministry the ministries developed numerous restrictive proposals.

MINISTRIES and state institutions have been interpreting Slovakia’s freedom of information law in a peculiar way, the Sme daily wrote on June 29. During the interdepartmental review of the legislation prepared by the Justice Ministry the ministries developed numerous restrictive proposals.

“Some of the proposals are literally absurd or shocking,” Peter Wilfling, a lawyer from the Via Iuris association told Sme, adding that the proposals defy the official agenda of the government under which the coalition has promised to push more transparency.

“For instance a proposal to punish [someone] with fines for filing a request if the institution believes that the citizen [who filed the information request] is abusing the law.”

The Personal Data Protection Office has proposed to introduce fines for abusing the law, amounting up to €1,650, Sme reported.

The Economy Ministry led by Juraj Miškov wants to stipulate that those requesting information about wages and remunerations cannot spread that information further or publish it.

The Slovak intelligence service, the SIS, headed by Karol Mitrík requested that its office be completely exempted from the law.

Interior Minister Daniel Lipšic suggested that public officials should not be fined for breaking the law and failure to comply with the law would be a misdemeanour.

Via Iuris activists are warning that the proposed suggestions from the government ministries might make it much more difficult for the public to receive information from state offices.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Who is ready for a vaccine in Slovakia

Vlhová won again. Boris Kollár is at home and will meet coalition partners to discuss GP vote. Justice Minister shows a new map.

Illustrative stock photo

Roundup: Bratislava’s Old Market Hall hosts Christmas markets

If you have not watched the 'Dracula' miniseries, filmed in Slovakia last year, it is about time.

Bratislava’s Old Market Hall will provide visitors with Christmas vibes in the coming four weeks. Each week, from Wednesday to Saturday, people can do a little bit of Christmas shopping at the venue.

From COVID-19 miracle to apparent resignation to death and dying

The natural reflex of all failed politicians – and their uncritical fan clubs – is to point to cultural or geographical differences between “us” and “them”.

The COVID-19 ward in the University Hospital Martin