Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

Ministers want less strict law on public access

MINISTRIES and state institutions have been interpreting Slovakia’s freedom of information law in a peculiar way, the Sme daily wrote on June 29. During the interdepartmental review of the legislation prepared by the Justice Ministry the ministries developed numerous restrictive proposals.

MINISTRIES and state institutions have been interpreting Slovakia’s freedom of information law in a peculiar way, the Sme daily wrote on June 29. During the interdepartmental review of the legislation prepared by the Justice Ministry the ministries developed numerous restrictive proposals.

“Some of the proposals are literally absurd or shocking,” Peter Wilfling, a lawyer from the Via Iuris association told Sme, adding that the proposals defy the official agenda of the government under which the coalition has promised to push more transparency.

“For instance a proposal to punish [someone] with fines for filing a request if the institution believes that the citizen [who filed the information request] is abusing the law.”

The Personal Data Protection Office has proposed to introduce fines for abusing the law, amounting up to €1,650, Sme reported.

The Economy Ministry led by Juraj Miškov wants to stipulate that those requesting information about wages and remunerations cannot spread that information further or publish it.

The Slovak intelligence service, the SIS, headed by Karol Mitrík requested that its office be completely exempted from the law.

Interior Minister Daniel Lipšic suggested that public officials should not be fined for breaking the law and failure to comply with the law would be a misdemeanour.

Via Iuris activists are warning that the proposed suggestions from the government ministries might make it much more difficult for the public to receive information from state offices.

Top stories

My five-year-old daughter will almost certainly encounter a Weinstein too

It’s not that I thought sexually harassing women was okay, it’s more that I accepted that was just part of how things worked. Unfortunate, yes, but also standard.

Harvey Weinstein

Socialism elections were parody of free vote

After the revolution in 1989 the number of people participating in elections fell from 99 percent to around 60 percent.

Elections during socialism regime.

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between November 17 and November 26, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Lúčnica

Top 3 stories from Last Week in Slovakia Video

Chinese could produce e-cars in Slovakia - PM Robert Fico does not see election defeat - Poliačik leaves the strongest opposition party

PM Robert Fico