Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Gašparovič and Radičová meet members of US Congress

Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič met a delegation of members from the US Congress on July 2, headed by a congressman of Slovak ancestry, John Mica, the TASR newswire reported, writing that Mica thanked Gašparovič for Slovakia's cooperation and partnership in the areas of business, investments and military operations. Mica's parents, who originally came from the village of Sobotište in Trnava region, moved to the US in 1907. The congressman has visited Slovakia several times. He met Gašparovič six years ago, shortly after the summit between US President George W. Bush and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin in Bratislava. Mica brought along a group of members of Congress, both Republicans and Democrats. None of them had visited Slovakia before and the group had travelled from Brussels.

Slovak President Ivan Gašparovič met a delegation of members from the US Congress on July 2, headed by a congressman of Slovak ancestry, John Mica, the TASR newswire reported, writing that Mica thanked Gašparovič for Slovakia's cooperation and partnership in the areas of business, investments and military operations.

Mica's parents, who originally came from the village of Sobotište in Trnava region, moved to the US in 1907. The congressman has visited Slovakia several times. He met Gašparovič six years ago, shortly after the summit between US President George W. Bush and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin in Bratislava. Mica brought along a group of members of Congress, both Republicans and Democrats. None of them had visited Slovakia before and the group had travelled from Brussels.

Gašparovič was pleased with the visit, praising the fact that Mica wanted to introduce the country of his ancestors to his colleagues. "I think that members of parliaments should meet more frequently and create an atmosphere of cooperation on real projects," he said.

The delegation also met Prime Minister Iveta Radičová, mainly discussing issues pertaining to transport, European security measures in civil aviation and public transport, and opportunities for economic cooperation.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).