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Labour Code to go to parliament

The new Slovak Labour Code prepared by the Labour Ministry and on the agenda of the ongoing parliamentary session will be adjusted according to changes agreed upon by members of the parliamentary social-affairs committee. Prime Minister Iveta Radičová announced this agreement by coalition leaders after four hours of talks in the Coalition Council on Wednesday, July 6.

The new Slovak Labour Code prepared by the Labour Ministry and on the agenda of the ongoing parliamentary session will be adjusted according to changes agreed upon by members of the parliamentary social-affairs committee. Prime Minister Iveta Radičová announced this agreement by coalition leaders after four hours of talks in the Coalition Council on Wednesday, July 6.

The prime minister said that a paragraph has been reinserted in the code that defines the national minimum wage. The revamped draft will provide more protection to women on maternity leave and also comply with the requirements that nurses sought in their recent petition. Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) members recently agreed with members of the petition committee that during the Labour Code vote in parliament they will support the requirement that night shifts and overtime work will no longer be obligatory for health workers over 50 years of age. Health-care workers will also be able to claim five paid days when used for continuing education.

Radičová reported that wages for nurses will be regulated in a separate law. "It would be illogical if wage conditions were anchored in the Labour Code for just one profession and it would open up the problem of how to address it for other professions," said the prime minister for the SITA newswire.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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