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Smer party reported highest income

OPPOSITION Smer party, led by former prime minister Robert Fico, which holds the highest number of seats of any party in parliament, had an income of €7 million in 2010.

OPPOSITION Smer party, led by former prime minister Robert Fico, which holds the highest number of seats of any party in parliament, had an income of €7 million in 2010.

The sum includes state contributions for votes won in the parliamentary election, for deputy mandates, contributions for operations, as well as membership fees amounting to €167,786, the SITA newswire wrote, citing information from the annual reports of political parties which parliament acknowledged on July 6. According to its annual report, Smer did not receive any external donations.

One of the ruling coalition parties, the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), had the second highest income according to the reports, with revenues of €4.7 million, which included more than €100,000 from membership fees and €86,736 in donations.

Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party, also of the ruling coalition, posted revenues of €2.4 million, of which €73,995 were contributions from members and €226,358 were donations. Another ruling coalition member, the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), posted revenues of €1.9 million, with over €69,000 in membership fees and €40,551 in donations.

Most-Híd, the fourth party in the coalition, was the only party not to report any membership fees. Its income reached €1.66 million, with reported donations of €261,238.

The opposition Slovak National Party (SNS) reported revenues of almost €1.6 million, with €18,547 coming from members and €3,500 coming from donations.


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