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Slovak-Austrian firms swap know-how

BRANCHES of Austrian companies operating in Slovakia are eager to keep improving their operations by using know-how and experiences from their parent companies. But knowledge and good business practices also travel in the opposite direction. The Slovak Spectator spoke with Luboš Sirota, the general director of the Slovak arm of Trenkwalder, a human resources provider, and Markus Jelleschitz, country manager of Gebrüder Weiss Slovensko, a provider of logistics services, about their experiences in sharing business practices and know-how between Slovakia and Austria. The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What business models or best practices have you adopted from your parent company for use in Slovakia? Luboš Sirota (LS): We have transferred from the parent company the practice of care for corporate clients, the principles of marketing communication, and the Trenkwalder Academy as the educational model for internal employees.

BRANCHES of Austrian companies operating in Slovakia are eager to keep improving their operations by using know-how and experiences from their parent companies. But knowledge and good business practices also travel in the opposite direction. The Slovak Spectator spoke with Luboš Sirota, the general director of the Slovak arm of Trenkwalder, a human resources provider, and Markus Jelleschitz, country manager of Gebrüder Weiss Slovensko, a provider of logistics services, about their experiences in sharing business practices and know-how between Slovakia and Austria.


The Slovak Spectator (TSS): What business models or best practices have you adopted from your parent company for use in Slovakia?
Luboš Sirota (LS):
We have transferred from the parent company the practice of care for corporate clients, the principles of marketing communication, and the Trenkwalder Academy as the educational model for internal employees.

Markus Jelleschitz (MJ): Service Excellence is one of the core values of Gebrüder Weiss and due to this best practices are always transferred throughout our whole network. By doing so we can make sure that we are permanently increasing the quality of our services and the processes involved. In addition to the general transfer of know-how, Gebrüder Weiss is also using the very strong know-how in Slovakia to adapt to Slovak market requirements and legal standards.


TSS: Have any of your business models, best practices or other positive initiatives been taken up by your parent company or other affiliates?
LS:
Several sister companies have adopted our recruitment processes for white-collar positions. Furthermore, management via a method called the Balanced Score Card is used by other affiliates and Slovakia was the first place where this was implemented and tested. It enables better measurement of the company’s performance by taking into account the quality of services provided and the satisfaction of clients.


TSS: What are your company’s plans in terms of investment and development in Slovakia over the next few years?
LS:
Our interest, after getting over the crisis years, is to continue our growth in market share in the segment of agency employment in Slovakia. In a short period of time we expect new acquisitions in the Slovak market, which would be a continuation of the strategy from 2006 and 2007. During that period of time Trenkwalder acquired 10 smaller companies operating in Slovakia.

MJ: Gebrüder Weiss Slovakia has made permanent investments over the past years to set up a high-quality transport and logistics network to serve the needs of customers in this market. In the future we also will follow this strategy and our investment plans cover further improvements in our IT solutions as well as establishing state-of-the-art terminals and enlarging capacities, particularly at our main terminal in Senec, near Bratislava.

Topic: Foreigners in Slovakia


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