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Employment Institute proposes project aimed at long-term unemployed

The introduction of a so-called ‘inclusive labour market’ should contribute to a reduction in the number of long-term unemployed, Viliam Páleník, president of the Employment Institute (IZ), said at a press conference on July 12, as reported by the TASR newswire.

The introduction of a so-called ‘inclusive labour market’ should contribute to a reduction in the number of long-term unemployed, Viliam Páleník, president of the Employment Institute (IZ), said at a press conference on July 12, as reported by the TASR newswire.

The institute said that “inclusive enterprises” would help unemployed persons to gain experience that they would then be able to use in the labour market. The project will focus on the long-term unemployed, people leaving prison and some other economically-inactive people, Páleník said.

The number of people without a job for more than one year has reached 300,000, which equals 12 percent of the potentially economically-active population, according to the institute, which proposes including 50,000 of these people in the scheme.

"[An inclusive enterprise] is a new type of company that would be obliged to employ at least 75 percent of its people from the target group. The companies would compete to acquire orders and employees," Páleník said, who added that the institute will propose setting up around 1,000 such firms.

Because a large number of people in the target group have poor qualifications, the companies would be active in the sphere of manual work such as forestry and unskilled construction work. The money invested in the project should return to the state within five years, with annual costs reaching €500 million, Páleník told TASR.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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