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Slovak parliament turns down two labour market proposals

Slovakia’s parliament rejected two labour code proposals – one aimed at easier dismissal of employees who reach retirement age and the other calling for replacement of meal tickets provided by employers with money instead, the TASR newswire reported. The first proposal, submitted by Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) MP Monika Gibalová was turned down by certain members of her own caucus as well as lawmakers from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ). MP Jana Dubovcová (SDKÚ) cautioned that if this provision was passed, the entire Labour Code may end up at the Constitutional Court due to its incompatibility with international human rights conventions. The other proposal on meal vouchers was submitted by independent MP Igor Matovič and was opposed by a host of coalition MPs from KDH, SDKÚ and Most-Híd.

Slovakia’s parliament rejected two labour code proposals – one aimed at easier dismissal of employees who reach retirement age and the other calling for replacement of meal tickets provided by employers with money instead, the TASR newswire reported.

The first proposal, submitted by Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) MP Monika Gibalová was turned down by certain members of her own caucus as well as lawmakers from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ). MP Jana Dubovcová (SDKÚ) cautioned that if this provision was passed, the entire Labour Code may end up at the Constitutional Court due to its incompatibility with international human rights conventions.

The other proposal on meal vouchers was submitted by independent MP Igor Matovič and was opposed by a host of coalition MPs from KDH, SDKÚ and Most-Híd.

"It would be the beginning of an end to the consumption habits," said SDKÚ's Stanislav Janiš, as quoted by TASR.

The parliament also rejected another Matovič proposal in which observance of certain public holidays would be moved from Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday to the day nearest the weekend. This notion was backed by Labour Minister Jozef Mihál (SaS).

A vote on the entire proposed amendments to the Labour Code is scheduled for July 13.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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