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Gašparovič continues to refuse to appoint Čentéš as general prosecutor

President Ivan Gašparovič is continuing to insist that he will not appoint Jozef Čentéš as general prosecutor until the Constitutional Court releases a ruling on a complaint submitted by acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý, the TASR newswire reported following a meeting between Gašparovič and Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity (SaS)) on Thursday, July 14. Sulík used the meeting to deliver a petition signed by 76 MPs (a majority) calling for Gašparovič to appoint Čentéš. A majority of MPs formally selected Čentéš in an secret vote in parliament last month.

President Ivan Gašparovič is continuing to insist that he will not appoint Jozef Čentéš as general prosecutor until the Constitutional Court releases a ruling on a complaint submitted by acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý, the TASR newswire reported following a meeting between Gašparovič and Speaker of Parliament Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity (SaS)) on Thursday, July 14. Sulík used the meeting to deliver a petition signed by 76 MPs (a majority) calling for Gašparovič to appoint Čentéš. A majority of MPs formally selected Čentéš in an secret vote in parliament last month.

"We hold the opinion that it is the president's duty to appoint a general prosecutor without any unnecessary delay. After the Constitutional Court cancelled its provisional ruling [which had appeared to block selection of a general prosecutor by any method], we don't see any reason why Mr. Čentéš shouldn't be appointed. We haven't found common ground [with Gašparovič] yet," Sulík said.

According to Sulík, the two men agreed that the president must appoint a general prosecutor without unnecessary delay, but did not agree on whether Constitutional Court proceedings justify a delay. "I can appoint him, but I can also seek reasons not to appoint him, such as the Constitutional Court proceedings. Nevertheless, I haven't said that I won't appoint him," said the president, who declined to speculate on what he will do in September when the verdict of the Constitutional Court is expected to be delivered. Nor did he explain what relevance the ruling would have, given that the court is considering the constitutionality of a rule change passed by MPs to make it possible for them to select future general prosecutors via a public vote, whereas Čentéš was selected using the secret-ballot method used for all such previous elections.

Source: TASR

For more information on this long-running story, please see Constitutional Court rules on its provisional decision on GP election method.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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