Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Anti-speeding police chief caught speeding

The head of the Slovak Police Corps, Jaroslav Spišiak, was caught speeding at almost 40 kilometres per hour over the limit on Tuesday, July 19. According to the TV news channel TA3, he was observed driving at 128 km/h between the municipalities of Bajč and Pribeta, on a road where the speed limit is 90 km/h, the Sme daily wrote, also on Tuesday.

The head of the Slovak Police Corps, Jaroslav Spišiak, was caught speeding at almost 40 kilometres per hour over the limit on Tuesday, July 19. According to the TV news channel TA3, he was observed driving at 128 km/h between the municipalities of Bajč and Pribeta, on a road where the speed limit is 90 km/h, the Sme daily wrote, also on Tuesday.

A police patrol from Komárno stopped Spišiak, but it is now known how much he was fined. Normally, drivers who exceed the speed limit by 38 km/h can be fined up to €150 on the spot. Interior Ministry spokesman Gábor Grendel told Sme that Spišiak would respect any punishment that he was given.

Spišiak also told TA3 that he would take responsibility and accept any punishment. After he took up his current job as police chief, Spišiak declared war on speeding and reckless driving, promising high fines and suspended driving licences for those he dubbed “road pirates”.

Sources: TA3, Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Giving a voice to those unheard

The Sme daily celebrates 25 years since its founding. It is of immense importance that it remains independent and free, writes its editor-in-chief.

Surcharges for night, weekend and holiday work will go up in two phases

Social partners agree upon a compromise solution.

Royal chocolate made by Slovak Photo

Some of the chocolate art pieces are decorated with gold or silver.

Veľký Rozsutec is open, just don't forget your climbing irons Photo

One of the most photogenic mountains in the Malá Fatra range is open in the winter, too.

Veľký Rozsutec, a photo from the mountain top.