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Number of foreigners working in Slovakia continues to grow

By the end of June 20,400 foreigners have been officially working in Slovakia, up by 3,000 people compared with the same period in 2010, according to data from the Central Office for Labor, Social Affairs and Family.

By the end of June 20,400 foreigners have been officially working in Slovakia, up by 3,000 people compared with the same period in 2010, according to data from the Central Office for Labor, Social Affairs and Family.

The majority of foreigners in the Slovak labor market are Romanian citizens: there were nearly 3,800 of them as of late June, which is 918 more than last year; 3,200 workers came from the Czech Republic, meaning a year-on-year increase of 722 people. Over 2,000 Poles and 1,900 Hungarians have been working in Slovakia this year, which is an increase of 746 in the case of Poles and 232 in the case of Hungarians, SITA newswire reported.

At the end of this six-month period a third of all migrant workers in Slovakia, or nearly 7,200 people, have been working in Bratislava. Trnava County saw the second highest number, with 1,700 foreign workers, followed by 1,100 working foreigners registered at Galanta Labor Office, and 1,000 working in Nitra. According to statistics not a single foreigner worked in Gelnica and Poltar Districts.

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