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Poll: Hungarian Coalition Party would get back to parliament

Opposition Smer party would have recorded a landslide victory in a general election if one had been held in the first half of July, according to a poll by Focus agency.

Opposition Smer party would have recorded a landslide victory in a general election if one had been held in the first half of July, according to a poll by Focus agency.

The survey, which was conducted between July 6-12 on a sample of 1,026 respondents, also showed that the main governing Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) party would have finished second on 12.6 percent. The other three co-governing parties followed, with the Christian Democrats (KDH) on 11.7 percent, Most-Híd on 6.9 percent, and Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) with 6.1 percent, TASR reported the poll results.

The ethnic-Hungarian SMK party would have made a comeback into parliament after dropping out in the general election in June 2010. SMK would have been backed by 5.8 percent, neck-and-neck with the Slovak National Party (SNS).

As a result, the current opposition parties, Smer and SNS, would have been able to forge a coalition with 79 legislators. Individual parties would have won the following number of seats: Smer would get 69, SDKÚ 21, KDH 19, Most-Híd 11, and SaS, SMK and SNS would get ten each.

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