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Matovič at PG hearing told everything on corruption

Independent MP Igor Matovič, leader of the Ordinary People faction, visited the Prosecutor General's Office on July 29 for a hearing on corruption among politicians, about which he told the media earlier in July.

Independent MP Igor Matovič, leader of the Ordinary People faction, visited the Prosecutor General's Office on July 29 for a hearing on corruption among politicians, about which he told the media earlier in July.

“I am accusing of corruption all the political parties which gained more than 3 percent in the elections,” Matovič said on July 18.

He went on to claim that the parties are abusing their power to nominate appointees to public positions in order to reward their sponsors and people who have been distributing flyers for them; he stated that professional qualifications were not considered in the appointments.

“I usually have such feelings at confession; I poured my heart out and told them everything I know,” Matovič said as quoted by SITA newswire.

According to him, the hearing was mostly about political nominations. He also said that 22 years after the fall of communism the country should finally end a period in which being a member of the Communist party was essential to any success.

Matovič, however, refused to be more specific on concrete party nominees and the parties that were to have installed them. There still is some written evidence he will submit to the prosecution. The MP added that he firmly believes that the prosecution will state that party nominations and cronyism are corruption and that he considers today's hearing the first dose of chemotherapy in party nominations that he considers cancerous, SITA wrote.

The hearing was initiated by Deputy Prosecutor General Dobroslav Trnka, although it was in fact carried out by the elected but not yet appointed Prosecutor General Jozef Čentéš.

Matovič started addressing corruption on July 12, when parliament was voting on his proposal to change the code to give employees the option of choosing between meal vouchers and cash payments.

Some coalition MPs however did not raise their hands for the suggestion. Matovič said that accounts of some MPs should be audited, indicating that meal voucher companies may be corrupting some members of parliament.

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