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Concert for Norway honours victims of massacres in Oslo and Utoya

A number of Slovak personalities came to express their solidarity with Norway and honour the victims of the massacre on Utoya island and the Oslo bomb attack by attending a concert on Bratislava's Main Square on July 31.

A number of Slovak personalities came to express their solidarity with Norway and honour the victims of the massacre on Utoya island and the Oslo bomb attack by attending a concert on Bratislava's Main Square on July 31.

The special commemoration event called Concert for Norway was organised by civil initiative Rose for Norway, which emerged spontaneously, and by Bratislava City Council, TASR newswire reported.

According to Daniel Rabina, the initiator of the idea, many artists promised to take part free of charge when they read about the event on Facebook.

"Everybody we asked to take part responded within five seconds without claiming any fee," said Rabina.

The concert featured a host of singers and musicians, including Zdenka Predná, Marcel Palonder, Marian Čekovsky, Soňa Horňáková, Oskar Rózsa, Miroslav Dvorský, Martin Valihora, Marian Greksa, Tomáš Sloboda with the 'Sounds Like This' project and Robo Grigorov.

The event also included a discussion featuring representatives of the Norwegian Embassy and members of the Norwegian community in Slovakia, TASR wrote.

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