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Trnka submits court complaint challenging Čentéš's election as General Prosecutor

Dobroslav Trnka, the current Deputy General Prosecutor and former General Prosecutor, last month submitted a complaint to the Constitutional Court challenging the parliamentary vote that elected Jozef Čentéš as General Prosecutor, the TASR reported, and the complaint has been assigned to a judge at the court in Košice. "I don't see any reason why I should comment on my complaint in the media," said Trnka when approached by TASR. The General Prosecutor's Office has declined to provide any comments on the case, saying the complaint was submitted by Trnka as a private individual. The Constitutional Court issued a provisional ruling on June 15 stating that a parliamentary vote on the new general prosecutor was permissible only after the court had decided on the issue of whether it was constitutional for parliament to change the vote from a secret ballot into a recorded one. Two days after the court’s ruling, parliament elected coalition candidate Čentéš as general prosecutor in a secret vote.

Dobroslav Trnka, the current Deputy General Prosecutor and former General Prosecutor, last month submitted a complaint to the Constitutional Court challenging the parliamentary vote that elected Jozef Čentéš as General Prosecutor, the TASR reported, and the complaint has been assigned to a judge at the court in Košice.

"I don't see any reason why I should comment on my complaint in the media," said Trnka when approached by TASR. The General Prosecutor's Office has declined to provide any comments on the case, saying the complaint was submitted by Trnka as a private individual.

The Constitutional Court issued a provisional ruling on June 15 stating that a parliamentary vote on the new general prosecutor was permissible only after the court had decided on the issue of whether it was constitutional for parliament to change the vote from a secret ballot into a recorded one. Two days after the court’s ruling, parliament elected coalition candidate Čentéš as general prosecutor in a secret vote.

The Constitutional Court then withdrew its provisional ruling two weeks later.

"With the secret vote [in parliament] on June 17, 2011, the reasons for the decision expired, while currently no other [reasons] exist that would indicate a potential threat to basic rights and freedoms ... The Constitutional Court, therefore, is cancelling its decision of June 15," the Constitutional Court wrote on its website.

President Ivan Gašparovič has refused to this point to appoint Čentéš to the post, saying he will not do so until the Constitutional Court releases a ruling on a complaint submitted by acting General Prosecutor Ladislav Tichý.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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