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Government passes strategic plan against corruption

Central state bodies and other institutions should draw up an analysis of corruption and proposals for tackling it by 2013, ministers decided at a government session on Wednesday, August 10. The Finance Ministry and the Tax Directorate should introduce an effective mechanism for collecting taxes and fees in order to lessen the scope for corruption in the tax sector by 2014. The move stems from a resolution passed by the government as part of the Strategic Plan to Fight against Corruption in Slovakia.

Central state bodies and other institutions should draw up an analysis of corruption and proposals for tackling it by 2013, ministers decided at a government session on Wednesday, August 10. The Finance Ministry and the Tax Directorate should introduce an effective mechanism for collecting taxes and fees in order to lessen the scope for corruption in the tax sector by 2014. The move stems from a resolution passed by the government as part of the Strategic Plan to Fight against Corruption in Slovakia.

The Office for the Fight against Corruption says that corruption occurs most frequently in public procurement, in drawing and distributing money from European funds, in the judiciary, in the tax administration, in the health-care system and in the police. The Police Corps has set up a website on which people can report illegal activities among police officers, the TASR newswire wrote. In 2010, Slovakia was placed 59th out of 178 countries surveyed for the purposes of the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI).

According to Prime Minister Iveta Radičová, the corruption represents a "web in which the whole of Slovakia is firmly entangled". She stated that so-called minor corruption is extremely prevalent in, for instance, health care and public-sector offices.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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