Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

State to provide €350 million to settle public hospitals' debts

The Slovak state will probably have to pay €350 million to settle the debts of public hospitals following their transformation from budget-subsidised organisations to joint-stock companies, the SITA newswire wrote on Monday, August 15.

The Slovak state will probably have to pay €350 million to settle the debts of public hospitals following their transformation from budget-subsidised organisations to joint-stock companies, the SITA newswire wrote on Monday, August 15.

The Finance Ministry has proposed that the sum be raised from the state's financial assets within the project of financial stability of health-care facilities. At the end of March this year, the overdue liabilities of state-run hospitals represented €240 million, while the non-overdue liabilities amounted to the same amount. According to previous statements by Finance Minister Ivan Mikloš, the reserves of the state privatisation agency, the National Property Fund (FNM), as well as the state's financial assets, were to be used for settlement of the hospitals' debts. Proceeds from privatisation of the hospitals were then expected to refill the FNM's coffers.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Safari under High Tatras Video

Marek Stolarčík from Kežmarok filmed unique video.

Illustration stock photo

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.