Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

False alarm at Jaslovské Bohunice nuclear plant causes panic

Public emergency alarms sounded in a wide area around the nuclear power plant in Jaslovské Bohunice (Trnava Region) on the evening of Wednesday, August 17. The reason for the alarm has not been officially confirmed, but plant operator Slovenské Elektrárne said that it was triggered by workers installing new sirens for the plant.

Public emergency alarms sounded in a wide area around the nuclear power plant in Jaslovské Bohunice (Trnava Region) on the evening of Wednesday, August 17. The reason for the alarm has not been officially confirmed, but plant operator Slovenské Elektrárne said that it was triggered by workers installing new sirens for the plant.

The piercing tones, which frightened thousands of people, suggested that many would not be able to react appropriately in the event of a genuine emergency. Emergency lines and phones operated by local municipal authorities failed, and rescue workers and local mayors were provided with no information and consequently had no idea what to tell alarmed citizens.

Regular tests take place at noon on every second Friday in each month and consist of a steady tone of sirens that lasts for two minutes. Wednesday's alarm, by contrast, was a fluctuating signal that is supposed to signal a chemical or nuclear accident. The crisis management department of the Interior Ministry told the Sme daily that in the case of an accident, the alarm would last for two minutes and would be followed by voice announcement.

The incident is being examined by the Nuclear Supervisory Authority.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.